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January 31, 2011

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Recent reading

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    Strange book for an atheist to recommend, I’ll grant, but Heschel’s 1951 classic is quite beautiful: a poetic and profoundly moving meditation on the role of the Sabbath in Jewish life, but a lesson also to anyone wanting to find at least moment a week when they can temporarily retire from the hamster wheel.

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