« Amplifier: The Wave | Main | More tantalising upcoming gigs in Brighton... which I'll miss »

January 31, 2011

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00e54f8ae3e888330148c830e05c970c

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Female singers from around the world 5: Yasmin Levy:

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been posted. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment




Recent reading

  • Andrew Holecek: Meditation in the iGeneration: How to Meditate in a World of Speed and Stress

    Andrew Holecek: Meditation in the iGeneration: How to Meditate in a World of Speed and Stress
    Holecek is a contemplative of decades' standing and a highly experienced meditation teacher. This book acts as both an urgent call to contemplative arms in the face of mass distraction and an introductory guide for the neophyte.

  • Tom Campbell: The Planner

    Tom Campbell: The Planner
    Campbell's second novel is a scathingly brilliant satire on contemporary London life, following a Southwark town planner's unexpected Faustian journey. Especially brilliant observations about life in the public sector abound.

  • Nina Teicholz: The Big Fat Surprise

    Nina Teicholz: The Big Fat Surprise
    An impeccably, indeed exhaustively researched, 10-year labour of love that takes apart, block by block, the shoddy science and dubious politics that underpin the low fat movement. Compelling stuff.

  • T. S. Eliot: Four Quartets

    T. S. Eliot: Four Quartets
    Widely regarded as Eliot's masterpiece, these four poems are as exquisite as they are daunting: meditations on place and time, and our relationship as human beings to both.

  • Abraham Joshua Heschel: The Sabbath

    Abraham Joshua Heschel: The Sabbath
    Strange book for an atheist to recommend, I’ll grant, but Heschel’s 1951 classic is quite beautiful: a poetic and profoundly moving meditation on the role of the Sabbath in Jewish life, but a lesson also to anyone wanting to find at least moment a week when they can temporarily retire from the hamster wheel.

  • Allen Ginsberg: Howl, Kaddish and Other Poems

    Allen Ginsberg: Howl, Kaddish and Other Poems
    My first shot at Ginsberg - and yes, very late. But wow; I now understand his rep - and the hype. This late 50s collection, kicking off with the epochal Howl, is mesmerising, hallucinogenic, virtuosic, shocking. Genuinely un-put-downable.

  • Nicholas G. Carr: The Shallows: How the Internet Is Changing the Way We Think, Read and Remember

    Nicholas G. Carr: The Shallows: How the Internet Is Changing the Way We Think, Read and Remember
    Carr’s book is essential reading for anyone thinking about the profound impact digital technology is making on our lives. Never shrill, always thoughtful but nonetheless deeply concerned, Carr makes an iron-clad case that our very brains are changing though our interaction with tech - and with far from positive consequences.

  • Alex Soojung-Kim Pang: The Distraction Addiction

    Alex Soojung-Kim Pang: The Distraction Addiction
    While eminently readable, veteran tech commentator Pang's book is erudite and hugely wide-ranging in its research, drawing on anthropology, clinical psychology, classical Buddhism and all points between. His message is clear, that we need to develop a more directed, conscious approach to our use of tech; he calls this "contemplative computing".

  • Denise Minger: Death by Food Pyramid: How Shoddy Science, Sketchy Politics and Shady Special Interests Have Ruined Our Health

    Denise Minger: Death by Food Pyramid: How Shoddy Science, Sketchy Politics and Shady Special Interests Have Ruined Our Health
    Food campaigner Minger's book is a highly detailed, thoroughly convincing and therefore somewhat depressing investigation into the weird convergence of bad science and dodgy politics that gave the world the food pyramid - and the unexpected health consequences that go with it.

  • Jason Fried: Rework

    Jason Fried: Rework
    A two-night read, at most... but stimulating for all that. The team at 37signals - now Basecamp - take apart a range of shibboleths about the workplace and set out new ways to work, and to live.

Recently Played Music